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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)
should he become defense secretary. how can you trust this guy haegle? >> you cannot. he represents the obama administration's foreign policy. he is handing off the cut backs to a former member of the military. i do not expect him to be part of the foreign policy. it will be closely held as it was in the first administration. he is a big defense cutter. maybe that is ironic he is a dedicated vietnam vet. it is going to slash the defense department more. >> the question is whether you are going to trim the budget with an axe of scalpel. chuck haeg eext lel can't get i. it takes decades. >> he was opposed to it. >> that may be one reason why he stepped down. i'm told that there is no sorrow. this is frying pan an fire. i know that chuck haegel a month into this process is likely to be the secretary of defense and the defense department is adjusting accordingly. what did all of this say of chuck schumer. he is such a prominent sjewish leader? how can he flip-flop like this? >> the senators are to judge chuck haegel on his record. it throws the whole process. it does. and i wonder wheth
comes up in a couple months, when that sequester fight comes up and defense cuts in a couple months, house republicans will push for the spending cuts but they don't want to lose the pr bat toll a president who's very adept at pointing his finger at republicans and saying they want to cause default. >> okay. i think they're losing the pr battle anyway. >> perhaps they are. >> i mean, i don't know. i know obama's very fassel, but i also know democrats will never cut spending in my lifetime. robert costa, welcome back from the wilds of williamsburg. now, i want to turn to my panel and say i don't really think the gop got the job done in williamsburg. that's just my view. here's cnbc contributor keith boykin. he's a former clinton white house aide. we have mark simone, w.o.r. radio talk show host, and matt welch, reason magazine editor in chief. mark simone, do you think the republicans are burning up the track here? what is their message? >> they have no message. now, let me correct one thing you said. the democrats will never cut spending. wait till hagel gets in place there at the d
and inflation all over the place. this year it's with cyclical growth, not defensive growth. not just getting paid to wait but it's cyclical growth right now. >> thank you, guys. >> good to see you. >> terry, welcome back. good to see you. >> the dow going out near the highs of the day, but, again, it's not setting the world on fire but some of the other averages are doing very well and it's just a day when apple is going to close below $500 a share for the first time in almost a year. the dow up 27 points. that's the first hour of the closing bell. here's the second hour now with maria. i'll see you tomorrow. >> and it is 4:00 on wall street. do you know where your money is? welcome back to the "closing bell." i'm maria bartiromo on the floor of the new york stock exchange. the dow jones industrial average closing higher today for a fifth session in a row. take a look at how we're settling out on the street tonight and the market does close at the highs of the afternoon and the dow is down 61 points earlier today. at the close, up 27 points. about a quarter of a percent higher at 13,534. nas
it was a progressive vision for the country. at the same time with the exception of his defense of the social safety net, which is to say medicaid and social security, climate change used to be a bipartisan issue. immigration reform used to be a bipartisan issue. even gay rights is something where you have conservatives that support marriage equality. in the end substantively is it that much of a dramatic shift? >> with the exception of gay rights, there is very little that is significant in the obama agenda that could not have been proposed and was not proposed by moderate republicans in the late 1990s and early 2000's. newt gingrich sat on the couch. the health care plan is based off the 1993 bob dole and lincoln chafy health care plan, and you can go on and on down the list like that. that's what i thought was interesting to e.j.'s point. this was not really a speech about what obama wants to get done next. it was about making a philosophical case for what obama and america has already done. somewhat what i think is unusual is an enormous amount of it and -- >> already one day in. >> already unus
in the nation. he's also the quarterback of the defense. he's the brains behind how they run the defense for one of the best teams in football and he's going to get duped on an internet scandal. it doesn't make sense. a girl dies. she was in a car accident allegedly she had leukemia and died. he never goes to see the familiar flifr goes to the grave site never goes to the hospital. they never skype. it just doesn't ring true. what rings a little more true is maybe, this would be very unfortunate if it's untrue. maybe he was an individual who isn't attracted to women and this was an opportunity for him to have an excuse he's in the spotlight he's a celebrity. he's expected to be surrounded with women in our society and this was a perfect way for him to push that obligation away and to go forward. unfortunately it all came crashing down a month ago notre dame knew about this a month ago and never told anybody. >> briefly because we want to get to lance. any lawsuits? >> any one including himself if he can prove he's a victim of this hoax and he can't sleep at night he has to see a sigh c psycholog
came back from that and put banned performance enhancing drugs in his body. his great defense was, after what i've been through, do you think i would put that stuff in my body and, of course, everybody said, everybody bought that because it was so plausible. so for lance to have actually doped after cancer was a pretty tough thing to do and i think it indicated a win at all costs attitude that was commendable and it was a seriously wrong thing to do. >> you were one of the very first people to question lance armstrong. it goes all the way back to 1999. what was it that made you suspicious in the first place? >> my first point of kind of suspicion was watching lance's treatment of a young french rider and there will be people out there, if they were all doping, how wrong -- how can you blame lance and single him out? they all weren't doping and one of the guys who did not dope in 1999 was a young french rider, and he offered the pin that you couldn't win this tour de france in '99 without doping and much of the colleagues resented him saying that. the guy who most resented him sayi
with spending in regard to the upcoming defense cuts, the sequester. they want to put the debt limit off for three months, get it out of the headlines, not let the president use it as a republican punching bag. trying to tell his colleagues, come to the center, let's move on to other issues. >> one of the interesting things about the way they did it and in doing it for only three months, dave, when you do it for three months the idea is you can always come back to it if you want. but it seems to me, certainly the way it is being reacted to or being read in the press, in saying there is going to be a three-month extension before the debate, they are saying we know we can't win a fight. we know we'll cave at the end of that. so seems like the threat is no longer credible. >> a lot of it did, what the republicans were saying, they were trying to educate their new members on exactly how the debt ceiling worked because that might not have been done last time. and paul ryan has the sort of, these are not the androids you're looking for, this will allow it to be your principle -- they just conv
to do with medicare social security, defense spending, what we have to do with tax reform. these are the tough choices. >> for example republicans have to make tough choices on defense cuts. >> we've got to cut defense. >> our combined defense budget is more than all the other countries in the world. republicans have to step up. i agree with you, governor. we have to do so much more than what you say in order to bend that curve. we have to do that but we've got to talk about -- >> we do. >> we've got to talk about raising the eligibility ages. >> we should look at medicare and social security in terms of how we strengthen them and preserve them for future generations, not as a piggy bank to offset the irresponsible decision making of policymakers. >> we just want it to be sustainable, david. >> that's what i'm saying. >> i have to say, though david, it's ironic you say that when you guys removed how many billions $700 billion, from medicare, which by the way, would have been good to make medicare more solvent in the coming years. >> actually, it did make
understand from defense secretary panetta there were probably about seven or eight americans initially, and some, as you said, have gotten out. they talked to their families, but it is still really unclear what has happened to nem. >> it surprises me there's so little information. early this morning, you know, this raid had already begun. so the fact that information has been so slow to come out surprises me, i guess because it's a remote region. did the algerians give the u.s. a heads up before they conducted the raid, do we know? >> they did not. that's what we're told by u.s. officials, they didn't. that's one of the growing frustrations. everyone understands, of course, it was a very difficult operation and remains a difficult operation, but without that heads up, the u.s. and i have been talking to some european countries that are expressing some frustration with a lack of information, conflicting information, not enough information on the u.s. hostages. so that is saproblem. >> we're also learning from defense officials, the u.s. is increasing its role in the conflict in mali. ho
hours to new york city and go shooting. >> to frank rich's defense, the areas are obviously a cultural breakdown on guns. there are urban enclaves that experience gun violence differently than in idaho. >> no doubt about it. >> that's the difficulty in passing any form of legislation is that you are doing a national legislation for a problem that has different pockets of resistance. >> right. >> and so what's promising, optimism for the president, is that some of his reforms that he suggested are incredibly -- are incredibly testing well many polls. 92% for back ground checks. has neglect -- have you guys ever seen anything polling 92% ever? >> longer recess and soda in the water fountains. >> you didn't mention uniforms. >> the question comes do you do this piecemeal? do you take stuff that polls well and put it out for a vote ask get that stuff pass and do the harder stuff later, or do you do it comprehensively and hope you can get one big package passed on? >> i don't have anything against frank. >> frank rich, we don't have anything against you. >> if you want to get this done, and
of the things we're keeping an eye on is some of the defense stocks. right under the shadow because of the possible quester. they are getting cheap and they have possible cash flows. >> glad you mentioned earnings. >> so far it's been somewhat mixed. i mean the banking sector is turning out some good numbers. >> yeah. >> where do you expect we might see the surprises on the upside in terms of the fourth quarter? >> in terms of sectors? >> yeah. financials have obviously done well, and that's somewhat cyclical. what i expect to do well are the consumer staples. they have been chugging along, but i think some of their expenses and costs were pretty moderate in the fourth quarter, and i think with the -- with the change in the taxes that came through in january, usually better for staples than consumer discretionaries so hopefully we'll get good numbers from there. >> where would you be investing, peter sorrentino? you said you like the early cyclicals? what does that mean? who do you like here? >> well, really it's a wide brush right now. we like refiners, the volero of the world. mar
a lower 18% growth rate. in defense of starbucks, they have a better brand not to mention, indeed, better coffee. you've got two ways to win, it could rally up to $14, i think that could be a conservative number or the stock could go to $16.24, i know, pretty precise, on a potential takeover bid. they seem to be addicted to coffee-related acquisitions as i'm addicted to coffee itself. it is at a 52-week high. and i'm willing to endorse buying the stock on a pullback. wait for some market -- believe me, it does happen, knock the stock down and then make your move. here's the bottom line, krispy kreme as this donutamid clearly shows is back. and it's giving you two ways to win. either the company gets taken ore or stays independent and grows like a weed. the only thing that gives me pause is the gigantic move in the share price. i'm begging, be patient, wait for a pullback and please use limit orders if you're going to buy kkd. let's go to bob in my home state of new jersey. bob? >> caller: boo-yah to ya, jim. >> how do you like that burger? cheese on it, onion, pickle, lettuce, that's from
to address the fact that they really are a good company. i hate the defensiveness. this is my theory on what's happened to intel. they have adopted a customer is always right attitude, but it turns out the customer was wrong. they had the wrong form factor, the wrong device. there was a moment in the call where it took my breath away, where paul said, they're talking about the fablet. this is a great american company. i'm like, you know, i actually said, i feel bad. >> they might have the wrong customers. if they have pc makers -- >> i know apple -- i did think this call was -- it was -- i mean, it's literally, are you guys getting any bang for your $10 million in research and development in 2012? they got the israel one going 24 hours. >> and chipotle. >> i shop and i go to factories. >> i have to tell you, this was an intel that was -- we're not as bad as you think. we're not as bad -- no, guys, have some pride. you're great. >> it seems at this point, jim t is a show-me stock. >> oh, is it ever. >> was there any mention of who might replace ottolini? did you see that in the transcript of
, on the capitol steps. bill russell, i'm sorry. thank you. now, in george stephanopoulos's defense, all tall people look alike to him. i see great chins, i don't know! still, for the rest of the morning, stephanopoulos did a very good job. we have venus and serena williams coming in. look at that, there's danny glover. the dazzling miss halle berry looking fine. look at that. there's general colin and bill russell. the crowd loves them! f >> oh, yeah, welcome back to "morning joe" live from washington d.c. we have a great crowd here. my gosh, jonathan capehart is still with us and joining us on the set, former white house press secretary, robert gibbs. he's not doing too well this morning. chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of andrea mitchell reports andrea mitchell and presidential historian, douglas franklin, author of "cronkite. this gentleman behind me, is he still here? he is right here. he is right here. he is not a republican. you might want to lose the bow tie then. misleading to me. >> all right. >> thank you very much. there you go. clarification. >> this business is not
with you. looks like juan is almost alone now in the defense of this dopey newspaper. what do you think is going on with williams? >> there's a long answer but we will cut to the chase. these are first semester journalistic efforts. so basic even the new york times has this. this is me agreeing with the new york times. it is different often between things that are public and whether they are news worthy whether you should be pairing those things in the newspaper. these are something journalists tackle all of the time. there are a lot of things that are public. they are probably juicy and fun to read but are you doing a public service by printing them? people on food stamps most people would argue that wouldn't be a good idea to print those with data and addresses and names after then. at least one of these homes have been burglarized that was on the list. i would argue it was not a safe thing to do or best thing to do. didn't serve a news person. >>> what do you think now that your liberal pals abandoned you and you are all by yourself in defending this newspaper. >> what about you and
offering plans to cut medicare, social security, defense, oh, please. i'll believe it as i see it, even though i think it's important that it be done. both parties guilty of too much spending. the democrats witt vitriolic, t to make money to pay for it. and enough politics. the american investor figures out we're pretty long through the united states of three-ring circuses. the most important spur for investment is confidence. three issues that held up business formation and stock investing for a long time. put a drag on it. uncertainty of the presidential election, uncertainty of the fiscal cliff and the sequester debt ceiling argument. two big bad events, only one more station on the gauntlet. it simply isn't as scary or meaningful as when it comes to the stock market or new business formation. sorry, it won't sell as many parents, and it just won't. smart investors are making a bet they can't wait for the third of the three washington incursions to be finished. once a big bad event is passed, the rick of responding floods in. now we're about to finish the third leg of the political s
spending as well as the defense department. each of them, they affect 8 to 10% reduction in expenditures. that's really painful to the gop but it's also very painful to the democrats, and i think that the threat of the sequester can get both parties to do what they need to do. that is, they need to sit in the room together and they need to hammer things out. instead of us lurching from one short-term solution to the next, hopefully they can do something that can last more than three or six months. it will be good for everyone. it will be especially good for the economy. >> good to see you, mr. tisch. thank you. >>> we're going to go to bert that coombs for a market flash. take it away. >> thanks, tyler. the teen retailer, bmo is out with a flash note saying it looks like the company is finally getting serious to turn things around. they want to focus on the expertise of some of the new management and also to try to capture that teenage mind not with key items, tyler, but the whole outfit. everybody likes to see the whole shebang. >> i like the outfits. >>> lance armstrong revealing all o
but notice the man who signed the defensive marriage act, bill clinton, opposed to gay marriage changed his position during the course of his presidency. >> every speech before 2004, looking for a constitution to ban gay marriage. >> i welcome it. what i didn't welcome was the most polarizing president that we had became more polarized. this was a speech for the 51% who voted for him. there wasn't much more for the 49% who did not. it was a speech that talked about collective action by the government and when you look at the biggest issue that we face of this era, it's the deficit. it's the trillion dollars of debt and the president didn't really talk about that. he talked about, we're not a nation of takers but that we've become a nation of debtors. >> the president clearly is a smart man, a smart politician. he's also a writer, a thoughtful person. if that is the speech, if the speech as ari described, why would he decide to give that speech? what's the political goal? >> this is the last time he's getting sworn in as president of the united states. that's why. i think it's martin luther
bank in the world reflating so you're very bull strategic defense initiative. >> very bullish. >> i guess the question is are you able to buy into that market at much lower houses? how substantial could a decline be on the so-called bumps in the road? there's some precedent for that. not the first time we've been through it. we've been back through it in 2011 and there's a significant pullback. there's a bit of a been there, done that and we haven't seen the kind of volatility we've seen and in the difference of backdrop the republicans sort of have their backs against the wall. they were forced to concede on taxes during the cliff debate, and now i think this is their chance to get concession on spending, and i think they are going to do that. this is going to go to the wall and that will create volatility. >> the president has been very clear. he's not going to negotiate on the debt ceiling. >> that's how politicians talk. at the end of the day negotiations will have to happen. >> he has to? >> you're not al lone in being wildly bullish right now and i think -- i know that's affec
it or not. and the number of companies that would really be affected from walmart to every defense contractor to giant health care companies, if their ability to collect money that is owed to them is then put in doubt, that triggers a whole, you know, range of activities of other people wanting to collect debts from them. >> sounds really scary. do me a favor, though, and crawl in to president obama's head for me and tell me why you think in 2006 he voted not to raise the debt ceiling and said the fact we're here today to debate raising the debt limit is a sign of leadership failure, the sign the u.s. government can't pay his own bills. what was he thinking there? >> voting against an increase of the debt kreeling is what you do in the opposition party. >> oh, okay. >> in congress. this is going back for the last many years. >> yeah. >> all the republicans in the senate voted for increases when bush was in office. they vote against it when obama is in office. and vice versa. the problem or challenges now is the house where republicans don't want to vote for it and we need them, you
service people, but gun protection or self-defense. i think that's the point they were trying to make. >> any objection for the presidents and republicans and democrats have been used for photo opes and the children, and i've seen the president stand up with soldiers, injured soldiers. >> the children of injured soldiers i know bush has probably done that as well, but something about pushing legislation though and implication and marco rubio made the point on my radio show today, the implication is you don't sign onto the president's proposals, you somehow are not treating the children or standing behind him with due respect. that's what i find offensive. that's the implicit message here. these children are with me. are you against the children? and that's where i think-- >> i think he's originally right when he said that kids really shouldn't be part of the political discussion. leave, now, kids out of it. >> the whole gun control debate has fired up everybody, but the president said today, if i quote him correctly, that anyone who disagrees new gun law opponents want to gin up fear
continue to invest in those companies with solid balance sheets. i continue to play defense. i listen to rick and mike and josh, and what i'm also hearing out of michael santoli and rick santelli, kind of a test, same day, come on, guys. when i listen to them both i'm hearing that bullish markets, bull market psychology. there's a certain complacency that comes along with a bull market where people begin to discount bad news. you throw bad news up and they say don't worry about that. look at the good points. the reverse happens in a bear market where we embrace the bad news and know there's never a ray of sunshine ever. we're in that discounting phase, and it feels complacent. it's a time to be cautious, so i think balance sheets matter. >> right. >> income matters and earnings really matter. >> very good. >> if you look at -- if you look at that philly fed this morning a great example. the market looked at that and said whatever. >> exactly. >> small caps and mid-caps didn't dip on the news. >> ignoring the bad news and going for the good news. >> real quickly, guys. on the philly fe
pa net athe defense secretary, said there were probably about seven to eight americans, but i have to say, you know, throughout the day, the numbers on all of this, where they are, who might be injured or any other condition is not really known. and the numbers of people who have been killed in this operation have really been all over the map. >> it's kind of odd to hear that they are taking a break. i mean if they've launched an operation to try to free hostages, the idea of taking a break in the middle of that operation seems very odd to me. i haven't really heard of operations where that has happened. and i was also surprised to learn that the u.s. was not informed or given a heads-up before they conducted this raid, right? >> in fact, yes. the u.s. officials that we've been speaking to say that they were not given a heads-up that this was going to take place, and that has create someday problems. this one official that we spoke to said that they actually, the united states, had urged and cautioned the algerians to be very careful in carrying this out to make the priority really
but today defense secretary leon panetta said he's working around the clock to bring any u.s. citizens home and issued a warning. >> terrorists should be on notice that they will find no sanctuary, no refuge, not in algeria, not in north africa, not anywhere. >> let me bring in nbc news chief pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski. the information out of algeria is complex and quite honestly hard to follow depending on some of the information sources, but at this hour what do we know about those americans there? >> reporter: well, it is very confusing in terms of number of americans initially taken hostage but nbc news learned that at least two americans able to hide from the militants when they first took over that nat gas plant there in the far reaches of algeria and since made their escape unharmed. there's an unknown number of american hostages that remain at that compound. in a briefing at the state department a short time ago, the spokesperson said we have american hostages and the spokesperson stressed it's a very fluid situation. now, we also learned that secretary of state hillary
of, you know, the state department and the defense department, will that help bring some of these lessons to bear? >> well, kerry and hagel saw the war firsthand in the delta, one of the areas where it was packed with civilians and where there were tremendous number of civilian casualties so i think that they did see some of the worst of the war. i would hope that having seen that up close and personal they'd be more reticent of taking this country to war. i think we have to hope for the best, that they can take that out of vietnam experience. i don't think that the carnage in today's wars is comparable to vietnam when it comes to civilians but we do know that civilians are still dying on a regular basis and still suffering a great deal and i'm afraid that, you know, if history is any guide we may not know the full story of that suffering for decades. >> all right. nick turse, thank you very much. >> thank you. >>> up next, the cyclist's favorite inaugural moments and never guess who picked one from the 1800s. it's not who you think. i'm heading to washington this weekend
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's a legitimate topic that should be under discussion. i think there is a lot of room in the defense budget for cuts, but our primary focus in terms of the economy should be job creation. so that means that the government has to spend in order to create economic stability. economic progress. we need jobs in this economy for middle class people and that's what will make this economy stronger and so if we cut then we're going against that very basic economic principle. when you constrict the budget and cut off the flow of money, you're not going have as many jobs available. so i am not -- i am not in favor of drastic cuts in spending at this time, but i do think long term we should be looking at reducing our debt and restoring fiscal sanity to our budget. >> a group of house democrats, yourself included you want to do away with the debt ceiling law altogether. this is congressman jerry neven, this is what he had to say about it. take a listen. >> it is time to repeal the debt ceiling and today we're introducing legislation to do just that. instead of playing a game of chicken with the full fa
in iraq. we are now in afghanistan. 12 years in. $2 billion a week. our defense budget keeps exploding. so an iranian crisis comes at the absolute worst time for this country. >> that's what i was saying early on. >> on so many points. >> things could change dramatically this year. >> richard and i have talked about this a lot. in search of a met tor, i have been thinking about the islamic role in africa and the middle east, think of it size a large, very dry forest after years of drought. and a lightning strike anywhere, which is unanticipated, starts a brush fire. and then it goes across. we just saw what happened in algeria. what's going on in syria at the moment. and we are not dealing state-to-state. there's an entirely new set of rules for dealing with that critical part of the world, to say nothing of the 300 million people who live there, the oil, the energy we have invested, and as richard and i have been talking, what happens to the kingdoms, saudi arabia next door? with an aging leadership. and they are in the bunker at the moment. and then all of the gulf states as well. jordan
preplanned. >>> and u.s. defense secretary leon panetta is vowing to pursuit hostage takers saying the terrorist should be on notice that they will find no sanctuary, not in algeria, not in north africa, not anywhere. back to you. >> jackie, thank you very much. any time there is an attack like this, it grabs the attention of new york energy traders. sharon, what are they saying? >> it certainly has. even though this occurred in the gas facility, it is the oil markets that are most concerned here about the heightened geo-political risk any time an attack happens on an energy facility. of course algeria is an opec member and produces just under 2 million barrels per day of crude oil. this pales to a country like saudi arabia but heightens the risk premium that is of course in that part of the world, in north africa and middle east. also you add to that what happened yesterday. nuclear inspectors and officials, talks between them breaking down, failing to come to an agreement, diplomatic effort in terms of iran's nuclear capabilities. that is heightening the geo risk in this marketpl
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)